Conference Community Psychology in Slovakia

Schermo per videoconferenza con un gruppo di persone Vettore gratuito
Affari vettore creata da upklyak – it.freepik.com

The conference is scheduled online for the 29 and the 30 November 2021.

Use the following link to attend the conference: join us on teams

See the program here

And do not forget that on November, 30 from 4pm to 6pm (CET time) we will have the General Assembly of European Community Psychology Association (ECPA) 

General Assembly

The General Assembly will take place online on November 30, at 4 PM (CET time) during the Community Psychology Conference in Slovakia. During the G.A. the election of the President for the next mandate (22-23) and the President-Elect for the following mandate (24-25) will be elected. To join the General Assembly please use the following Teams link

The Agenda will be the following

  1. Welcome
  2. Approval of the last GA minutes
  3. Report of the activities
  4. Elections
  5. future plans

The General Assembly is open. Notice however those only members who paid membership fees can vote.

A Social Capital Approach to Understanding Community Resilience during the Covid-19 Pandemic – CROP#6

Friday, November 12, 2021, 5 PM (GMT)

Register here

Discussion of a paper by community psychologist Suzanne Wilson (UCLan, UK) highly relevant for community resilience in global crises.

About the event

As the world begins to take stock of the impact of Covid-19 on communities, this paper provides a critical review of the role of mutual aid groups in the community response in the UK. Drawing on a narrative review of available literature, interviews with community members and selective case studies we consider what forms of social capital impact on access to mutual aid support in the community response to Covid-19. The three case studies will identify enablers to participation in community resilience responses to Covid-19. The research found that communities with social capital have been among the most organised in providing mutual aid, and sometimes this has extended to supporting the more marginalised and disadvantaged sectors. The phenomena of collective resilience in the pandemic, and in particular the activities of mutual aid groups as described in this paper, testify to the relevance of key concepts in social and community psychology. Without psychological ‘groupness’ – the sense of being a part of and identifying with a community, and the motivations and commitments that come from that – there would be no adaptive community response.

Previous research in community resilience explored responses to the multiple culture traumas of floods and a mass shooting. Suzanne is currently researching the impact the COVID-19 crisis is having on families who were already experiencing poverty and published a rapid response paper on this topic.

About the presenter

Suzanne Wilson is a Research Fellow in Social Inclusion and Community Engagement at The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan). The research agenda, which is in partnership with the Samuel Lindow Foundation and The Centre for Citizenship and Community, is to work with communities to identify effective and sustainable means of increasing community capital. This expanding portfolio of research focuses on working-class, coastal communities, often regarded as being ‘left-behind’ and recently won a Golden Apple Award for ‘Best Community Initiative’.

The innovative format of the CROP Workshops/Salons follow the principles of writers workshops which are used by the pattern community. Please be informed about the rules by reading the CROP Workshop Agenda Rules and/or Writers Workshops as a Scientific Method

Please make sure to read Suzanne’s full paper before the event. Once you register you will receive the paper by November 5.

To participate, please click here | Meeting ID: 836 1200 3686 | Code: 043398

Call for papers “The Faro Convention Implementation. Heritage Communities as Commons: Relationships, Participation, and Well-being in a Shared Multidisciplinary Perspective

The Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society (Faro Convention) brings the debate on the theme of cultural heritage as a common good in its various material and immaterial dimensions and linked it to the identity of places and communities up to date. The Convention affirms that all forms of cultural heritage in Europe that together constitute a shared source of legacy, understanding, identity, cohesion, and creativity are part of cultural heritage.

This broad definition, which also refers to the role and function of citizens’ participation, opens the door to a multitude of possible intercultural and interinstitutional collaborations and innovative ways of promoting the development of cultural sites, communities and heritage.

Cultural heritage provides communities with tangible and intangible experiences that favour the perception of common past and traditions, creating connections between citizens and places and between citizens and the community, favouring a focus on local dimensions, enhancing resources and natural, environmental, cultural and social heritage, improving the quality of life.

They offer opportunities for discussion and debate on issues affecting the entire community, as well as to expand their social network, impacting the ties within and with the community through their physical and social characteristics and through the social and cultural environment that they host as part of “The Faro Convention Implementation. Heritage Communities as Commons: Relationships, Participation, and Well-being in a Shared Multidisciplinary Perspective” conference.

The Community Psychology Lab (Humanities Department) of the University Federico II and IRISS (Institute for Research on Innovation and Development Services) of the National Research Council of Italy and the Venice Office of the Council of Europe, with SiPCO (Italian Society of Community Psychology), ANIAI (National Association of Italian Engineers and Architects), AIP (Associazione Italiana di Psicologia), PSI-COM APS (Associazione di Promozione Sociale), invite scholars and professionals of human relations and habitat: psychologists, sociologists, architects, economists, lawyers, social and cultural managers to participate in the conference and to submit an abstract.

The deadline to submit abstract proposals is October 20, 2021

The conference will be held both live in Naples (Complesso del SS. Marcellino e Festus Ateneo Federico II) and with online sessions, on 16 and 17 December 2021.

Abstract
Abstract (max 250 words) in Italian or English must be sent, according to the following format, to the Organizing Secretariat (email:naplesfaroconvention2021@gmail.com) no later than 20.10.2021.

The communication of the acceptance will be sent, within 25.10.2021, to the e-mail address indicated in the abstract. It is also planned a special issue to which participants will be able to contribute.

Scholars, belonging to different disciplinary fields, are called to investigate and discuss, in the perspective of the Faro Convention, the following issues aimed at the development of Heritage Communities:
1. Places, participation, values and connections
2. Individual and collective rights in the participatory management of heritage
3. Cultural commons, valorization of cultural heritage and urban regeneration
4. Collaborative governance, management and business development
5. Identity of places, attachment, belonging and sense of community
6. Coexistence, ties, and memory

Abstract Format
Title
Authors, afferent, email
Corresponding author
Abstract (max 250 words)
Keywords (max 5)
Thematic area of reference

Promoting Committee
Caterina Arcidiacono (DSU UNINA), Alessandro Castagnaro (ANIAI), Maria Cerreta (DIARC UNINA), Massimo Clemente (IRISS CNR), Gaia Daldanise (IRISS CNR), Immacolata Di Napoli (DSU UNINA), Eleonora Giovene di Girasole (IRISS CNR), Luisella Pavan-Woolfe (Consiglio d’Europa Ufficio di Venezia), Fortuna Procentese (SIPCO)


Scientific and organizational team
Stefania Carnevale, Emanuele Esempio, Benedetta Ettorre, Flora Gatti, Simona Stella

Info: naplesfaroconvention2021@gmail.com

More info:

People Protecting Each-other Sustainably – PPEs

People Protecting Each-other Sustainably (PPEs) was developed to recruit and manage over 100 Northeast
Ohio volunteers. People Protecting Each-other Sustainably used the social media platform Facebook to facilitate material donations, volunteer recruitment and training, and to function as an ongoing central communications hub. Leaders used an assembly line process with zero contact pick up and drop off at multiple stages of production to allow safe assembly and distribution of face masks.

A total of 7,695 handmade face masks were created to distribute to local frontline responders in 10 weeks. Use of upsourced and donated materials allowed this project to reduce potential landfill waste and made a zero cost project possible. Volunteers had positive responses to the project and reported benefits from their participation.

This model has been successfully recreated by a smaller group in Geauga County, Ohio, with similarly successful results. Clearly this model of community mobilization has the potential to be replicated in other state of emergency crises and emergency response situations to produce lifesaving or necessary equipment when industry standard equipment is not readily available.

For more information, please click here.

Story submitted by Andrew Snyder, USA

asnyde20@kent.edu

8th Conference and Workshop in Community Psychology

We are happy to invite you to the 8th Conference and Workshop in Community Psychology in Slovakia 2021.

The conference will be online and the dates are 29th November – 30th November!

The goal of the conference and workshop is to provide time and space for both researchers and practitioners from various areas of community psychology in Europe so they can meet, present their work and research, inspire each other, and enjoy socializing together. 

Organisation: Institute of Applied Psychology at Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences at Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia, European Community Psychology Association (ECPA), and The Society for Community and Action Research (SCRA) Division 27 American Psychological Association. 

Conference and workshop dates: 29th November – 30th November, 2021 (9.00-18.00)  

Conference and workshop language: English and Slovak (please, prepare your presentation in English in both cases) 

Conference and workshop fees: No fee (free access)

Deadline for active participation in the conference: Please, fill in this form within October 15th, 2021

The proceedings from the conference will be published in electronic form with ISBN. The deadline for the submission of the conference papers is November 5th, 2021 (CommunityPsychologySlovakia@gmail.com) in order to be reviewed and published online prior the conference. 

Proceedings from the last year was indexed in WoS. We will be applying for WoS indexing again this year. 

For more information follow:

Looking forward to see you in November! 

Examining and challenging immigration detention: what role for community psychology?

Webinar with Francesca Esposito, September 23, 2021. Discussant: Regina Langhout.

About the webinar

During the past few decades, the detention of illegalised non-citizens has become a common practice in a world increasingly characterised by concerns for homeland security and the criminalization of human mobility. In this context, immigration detention centres have become new total institutions used to confine ‘unwanted’ non-citizens, especially coming from the so-called global South, and achieve immigration-related aims such as deportation. This measure, and border control more broadly, is strongly affecting the lives of individuals, their families and communities at large.

Within the quite limited body of empirical research produced on immigration detention, the majority of contributions in the medical and psychological fields have been dedicated to assessing the clinical consequences of detention, detailing the long-term psychological distress that it causes on those subject to it (detainees). Notwithstanding the importance of this research, there is currently a need to adopt an ecological perspective from which to study these sites as well as the experiences of those within them as context-dependent and influenced by power inequalities.

Drawing upon advances in community psychology, I will illustrate an ecological framework for the study of immigration detention settings and their multi-level effects on those inside them. This framework focuses on justice as a key dimension of analysis. Taking the largest Italian detention centre as a case study – the Ponte Galeria detention centre in Rome – I will also present a concrete example of application of this same framework in a research aimed at examining the life and lived experiences of both people detained and practitioners working with them.

Findings highlight the oppressive qualities of immigration detention and its detrimental effects on all people coming into direct or indirect contact with it. Scarcity of resources, activities and information created a very distressing environment for detained people, while also enhancing feelings of powerlessness and frustration in practitioners willing to assist them. Bound in a different space and time, detained people were turned into dispossessed subjects, completely estranged from the outside community. Despite the hostile environment surrounding them, however, people languishing in Ponte Galeria displayed an extraordinary ability to cope with, resist and challenge the persisting conditions of injustice they endured.

I will conclude by discussing the broader implications of these findings for transformative research, politics and action, with a particular focus on the role of community psychologists.


About the presenter

Dr. Francesca Esposito completed her PhD in Community Psychology in 2019, at the ISPA-University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal. From 2019 to 2020 she was a British Academy Newton International Fellow at the Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford, then a researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon and more recently a Lecturer at the University of Westminster in London. Francesca’s research focuses primarily on immigration detention, in Portugal, Italy and the UK. Mixing qualitative/quantitative interviews and ethnographic observations, she critically examines the life and lived experiences of people inside detention centres. Particularly, her recent project, entitled “Making Gender Visible in Immigration Detention”, looks at the gendered and racialised experiences of detained women and at their strategies of survival and resistance. Francesca is interested in participatory methodologies and feminist community psychology approaches, and in her work she combines scholarly research, community-based intervention and activism. Since 2020, she has been a member of the Executive Board of the European Community Psychology Association (ECPA).


About the discussant

Professor Langhout’s primary research takes place in elementary schools and neighborhoods that serve working class and working poor African American, Latina/o, and white students. She uses a paradigm called participatory action research (PAR) to critically examine schools and neighborhoods. With PAR, stakeholder groups collaborate to determine problems and interventions. Her empirical research includes determining recess interventions though playground observations and focus groups, surveying teachers, parents, and students to assess their perceptions of school context, and working with young people to develop and paint a mural on school grounds in order to create a more welcoming atmosphere for students and their families.

Lockdown Spirit Lives On as Neighbour Groups Become Swap Shops

During the pandemic, community members in south London began communicating via WhatsApp. They were able to fulfill requests in the community at no cost to those in need. A year and a half later, rather than go back to traditional means of selling items through on-line garage sales, these south Londoners were still using the app to swap and share services at no cost.

This spirit of swapping was happening in other communities as well. The Freecycle Network, a platform where people share items for free, saw a 50% increase during the pandemic. People discovered they were finding connection through generosity and wanted it to continue.

Photo share from the Guardian.com

A retired school teacher learned she could use Freecycle to ask for items needed by asylum seekers. She received an overwhelming response and spread the generosity of the Freecycle community to other groups. They raised money and swapped things that may have otherwise ended up in landfills.

One of the lessons learned by this community was that making connections and helping one another for no personal gain is contagious. What started as a way to help during a global pandemic proved to be a sustainable way to funnel items in the hands of those who need them. In addition, they were able to work toward the broader goal of keeping usable items out of landfills.

For more information, click here.

Story shared by, Bradley Olson, PhD, USA

Unexpected Death Sparks Community Unity

The unexpected death of a Lake County, Illinois man sparked community unity. On August 2, 2021, Clyde Lewis Jr. was fatally injured in a car accident while he was on his way to help a friend “save” her son from being under-sheltered. The friend also suffered fatal injuries in the crash. This young man was a beloved member of this community. Three of his friends felt the need to “do something” to honor him.

Three of his friends felt the need to “do something” to honor him. On August 3, 2021 within a 3-hour time period these three friends, Rayon Edwards (Ray Ray), Trina Friar (Trixi), and Ronald McCarthy (momma), called out the community to meet at “King Park” for a balloon release and candlelight vigil. The gathering was scheduled for three hours. Within the three hours over 400 people showed up to honor this young man. Community members brought food to grill, games for kids, alcohol to “pour out” (by tradition -honoring a fallen homie).

People do not have to be conventional by society’s standards, educated, well-mannered, and the like, they just have to have a caring heart and the spirit of community building to make it happen. Rayon Edwards (Ray Ray), Trina Friar (Trixi), and Ronald McCarthy (momma) three of this communities marginalized and oppressed by stereotypes and labels that, as shown by the events of August 3, 2021, do not define who they are or what they are capable of doing in their community.

Story shared by, MoDena Stinette, USA

Project Taillight

Project Taillight seeks to connect low-income residents with proactive headlight, taillight, license plate light, and/or turn signal repair services for free. Students of the Columbus State Automotive Technology program provide labor for this innovative public safety and crime prevention program. Because non-violent crimes are more often linked to poverty and lack of opportunity, this program reduces the need for residents and police to interact over minor violations.

Photo retrieved from columbusunderground.com

The goal of the program is to reduce minor traffic violations, allowing police to focus on more violent crime, while also reducing the number of times residents are pulled over along the side of the road for non-violent crimes. Additionally, it is a way for Columbus State students to give back to the community.

Some repairs have proven greater than the students can manage, but they work to coordinate assistance. They have interactions with the residents and learn how to provide customer service. The program has a $50,000 budget and also received a $25,000 contribution from the Columbus Department of Public Safety general fund. They hope to grow and expand.

For more information, please click here.

Story shared by Leslie Hatch Gail, USA