High School Students Are Demanding Schools Teach More Black History, Include More Black Authors

Three high school students, strangers to each other and separated by miles, launch a campaign to demand that schools teach more Black history, include more Black authors in the English syllabi, and other reforms that promote racial equity. The teenagers are using social media to plan reformers, to pressure school officials, and to access inspiration from other activists.

Picture retrieved from Black Children’s Books and Authors (BCBA)

They hope the reforms will promote racial equity.

The success of these efforts will promote racial equity.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

Neighbors Harvest Crops for North Dakota Farmer Who Had Heart Attack

After a farmer in North Dakota, suffered a heart attack while harvesting his crops, between 40-50 neighbors organized to complete the harvesting while the neighbor was at the hospital. The neighbors realized that without their help, the 1,000 acres of crops would be spoiled and that would both a personal and financial loss to their neighborhood.

Picture from National Geographic

Within 7 hours, the crops were harvested and stored in bins. Importantly, the Unhjem family was comforted to know they had neighbors who prayed and cared for them when they were most in need.

This story shows the power of the community spirit.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

St. Xavier student creates website for grocery delivery during the pandemic

To help those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic, Trip Wright, a 17th-year-old college student in Cincinnati, created the zoomfooddeliver.com organization. The aim was to provide safe and free grocery deliveries to the elder and those who could not get to the stores because they were susceptible to contracting the virus. Within two weeks, Wright had recruited 70 volunteers and had fulfilled 30 orders. Between his online classes, Wright checked emails and orders so as to correspond between those in need and the volunteers.

The elderly and those susceptible to the coronavirus in Wright’s community could stay at home and have groceries delivered to them for free.

Creative ways to cater to the needs of those susceptible to the coronavirus while keeping them safe.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

NYC Opens Special Centers for Kids of Healthcare and Other Essential Workers on the Front

The New York state school system set up regional enrichment centers for children of front-line works. In these centers, the children do their homework in spaced-out desks, eat three hot meals and learn how to protect themselves from COVID. These centers served the children’s needs while their parents fought COVID-19 at the forefront as medical personnel or as essential workers.

Picture retrieved from Good News Network

8,000 children continued their learning, were well-fed, and learned protective measures against COVID-19. Essential workers were freed up and so, they were able to continue the life-saving work.

Economic inequalities were minimized because the centers were open for all parents who needed the service for their children.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

Face masks designed for the deaf and hard of hearing community

College senior Ashley Lawrence noticed that the masks that were being made did not cater to the needs of those that are deaf and hard on hearing. Ashley, who is majoring in deaf education decided to design masks with transparent screens around the mouth. The transparent screen enabled those who can lipread to read the lips of the mask wearer. They also ensure the people see more of the facial expressions of the wearer.

Images retrieved from DiversityNursing Blog

Masks that were sensitive to the needs of the deaf and the hard in the hearing were designed. Ashley reports that many people reached out to ask for the masks.

The importance of looking out for the needs of the marginalized, those that are easily overlooked.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

WRTV launches ‘The Rebound: Indiana’ to help Hoosiers bounce back in COVID-19 economy

The WRTV launched Rebound: Indiana which is a one-stop online shop that helped the community to navigate through the financial impact because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The target is the Hoosiers (Natives of Indiana) and the aim is to help them find unemployment and economic stimulus resources. The online viewers were connected to the top officials from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. Using advocacy, assistance, accountability, and investigation, The Rebound: Indiana hopes to help the Hoosiers bounce back and recover.

Image by WRTV

The community was reconnected with resources.

Creative ways to bring professionals to the community using technology. The natives/minorities were prioritized in the intervention.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

Single foster dad adopts five siblings

Robert, Carter, a single dad from Ohio adopts five siblings because he did not want them separated. Mr. Carter said he was already fostering the three boys, but decided to adopt them all when he saw how they cried after the visit with their sisters.

The siblings were reunited in one home. The children had a home and a loving dad who promised to be their dad forever.

Providing a home and a family to the children did not only meet an emotional need; it may also have increased their chances of success later in life.

Picture retrieved from Fox 13 News

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

An Eco-Friendly Approach to Supplying the Public With Protective Masks

The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) has partnered with Rash’s to make face masks out of plastic pollution. Through this innovation, PADI is making alternative sustainable face masks to the limited N95 masks reserved for health care workers.

PADI has recycled more than 1,300 pounds of ocean pollution to meet the pre-orders of 15,000 masks. An unintended consequence of making alternative sustainable masks is the cleaning of the ocean. The masks are washable hence reducing wastage.

Alternative face masks were available hence more protection. This innovation motivates the cleaning of the ocean hence it is environmentally friendly.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

Staying Sober in Quarantine

The Phoenix uses health and fitness to help individuals overcome addiction. Using quarantine, in-person sessions were not possible because of social distancing guidelines. Mindful of the isolation that those recovering from addiction experience even without the quarantine, the Phonex creatively switched to online classes and virtual group meetings.

Those working on their recovery continued to receive classes and attend group meetings online.

Challenges are catalysts for innovation.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

Nashville Residents Support Man Afraid to Walk Outside Alone in Childhood Neighborhood

Neighbors in Nashville responded to a Black man who said was after to walk around his childhood neighborhood. The man stated he was afraid he may not live to see another day if he walked by himself. This was around the time George Floyd was killed. In response, neighbors decided to walk with him.

Picture by Shawn Marqus Dromgoole

The Black man walked around his childhood neighborhood accompanied the residents. The Black man later said the community support made him feel heard and human.

The power of a neighborhood in standing up for the vulnerable. The White community helped the Black man feel safe, heard, and cared for.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu