Face masks designed for the deaf and hard of hearing community

College senior Ashley Lawrence noticed that the masks that were being made did not cater to the needs of those that are deaf and hard on hearing. Ashley, who is majoring in deaf education decided to design masks with transparent screens around the mouth. The transparent screen enabled those who can lipread to read the lips of the mask wearer. They also ensure the people see more of the facial expressions of the wearer.

Images retrieved from DiversityNursing Blog

Masks that were sensitive to the needs of the deaf and the hard in the hearing were designed. Ashley reports that many people reached out to ask for the masks.

The importance of looking out for the needs of the marginalized, those that are easily overlooked.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

WRTV launches ‘The Rebound: Indiana’ to help Hoosiers bounce back in COVID-19 economy

The WRTV launched Rebound: Indiana which is a one-stop online shop that helped the community to navigate through the financial impact because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The target is the Hoosiers (Natives of Indiana) and the aim is to help them find unemployment and economic stimulus resources. The online viewers were connected to the top officials from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. Using advocacy, assistance, accountability, and investigation, The Rebound: Indiana hopes to help the Hoosiers bounce back and recover.

Image by WRTV

The community was reconnected with resources.

Creative ways to bring professionals to the community using technology. The natives/minorities were prioritized in the intervention.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

Single foster dad adopts five siblings

Robert, Carter, a single dad from Ohio adopts five siblings because he did not want them separated. Mr. Carter said he was already fostering the three boys, but decided to adopt them all when he saw how they cried after the visit with their sisters.

The siblings were reunited in one home. The children had a home and a loving dad who promised to be their dad forever.

Providing a home and a family to the children did not only meet an emotional need; it may also have increased their chances of success later in life.

Picture retrieved from Fox 13 News

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

An Eco-Friendly Approach to Supplying the Public With Protective Masks

The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) has partnered with Rash’s to make face masks out of plastic pollution. Through this innovation, PADI is making alternative sustainable face masks to the limited N95 masks reserved for health care workers.

PADI has recycled more than 1,300 pounds of ocean pollution to meet the pre-orders of 15,000 masks. An unintended consequence of making alternative sustainable masks is the cleaning of the ocean. The masks are washable hence reducing wastage.

Alternative face masks were available hence more protection. This innovation motivates the cleaning of the ocean hence it is environmentally friendly.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

Staying Sober in Quarantine

The Phoenix uses health and fitness to help individuals overcome addiction. Using quarantine, in-person sessions were not possible because of social distancing guidelines. Mindful of the isolation that those recovering from addiction experience even without the quarantine, the Phonex creatively switched to online classes and virtual group meetings.

Those working on their recovery continued to receive classes and attend group meetings online.

Challenges are catalysts for innovation.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

Nashville Residents Support Man Afraid to Walk Outside Alone in Childhood Neighborhood

Neighbors in Nashville responded to a Black man who said was after to walk around his childhood neighborhood. The man stated he was afraid he may not live to see another day if he walked by himself. This was around the time George Floyd was killed. In response, neighbors decided to walk with him.

Picture by Shawn Marqus Dromgoole

The Black man walked around his childhood neighborhood accompanied the residents. The Black man later said the community support made him feel heard and human.

The power of a neighborhood in standing up for the vulnerable. The White community helped the Black man feel safe, heard, and cared for.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu

Vanilla Feeds Tomorrow

During the quarantine, I set up a nonprofit that makes and sells homemade, pure vanilla extract that donates all of its profits to help hungry individuals throughout East TN by supporting Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee. I want to help because I lived in an area that had many people who were battling hunger, and I saw the effects it had on them.

People across the region of East TN that are battling hunger might have a meal because of the support Vanilla Feeds Tomorrow has received.

I am a Freshman in High School and I received one of my largest surges of orders when I was just beginning to adjust to school in 2020 during my fourth day at school. I was stressing about getting all of the orders out, but my family and friends helped me get them out on time. I learned how supported I am and what great people are around me. I could not have made it through that period without their support.

Story shared by William Cabaniss, USA.

More info here or at vanillafeedstomorrow@gmail.com

Food Security, Feeding Body, and Soul

Soil Born farms is located within 55 acres of a community farm in Rancho Cordova, CA. Soil Born believes that all communities should have access to high-quality locally produced food. To facilitate this access, Born Soils trains people to grow their own food even within the city. In 2018, 1,795 adults attended classes in Born Soils. An important vision for Born Soil is to train young people on the value of nutrition and how to grow food in the city. They offer summer camp experiences for pre-K through high school. They offer scholarships for those that cannot afford them.

Image by National Civic League

In 2018, there were 59 beginning farmers trained; 1,795 adults attended gardening, cooking, and herbal care classes; 2,557 students engaged in school gardens at 10 campuses; 4,200 students enjoyed hands-on experiences at American River Ranch; 386,060 pounds of fruit donated to families in need, and 130,000 plants of 118 varieties were seeded in their greenhouse.
During the summer camps, the youth reconnected with themselves, the land, and the community.
Also, because of volunteers, there is less wastage of fruit since they collect these from farmers and donate them to local food banks and other emergency food resources.

Many people are interested in locally grown and healthy foods as evidenced by the people seeking information and training. Healthy foods can be grown in the city so long as people are trained on how to do it. Inequalities were reduced by donating fruits to those that could otherwise not afford them and by providing scholarships to students who were interested, but could not afford the summer camp experiences.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

Liquor Store Turned into a Food Market

Young teenage entrepreneurs in the Austin neighborhood, Chicago, galvanized and turned a liquor store into a food market. With some help from their friends, these young entrepreneurs decided to convert their raw and powerful emotions into a social justice cause. They decided to create the Austin pop-up food market that would provide alternative healthy food options in a place that was otherwise a food desert. Their vision was actualized by the support of some professional athletes who provided the funding, and the By the Hand Club for Kids who brought in architects and branding experts for guidance.

Picture By the Hand Club for Kids

The outcomes included the availability of healthy foods within the Austin neighborhood, the transformation of a food desert into a healthy food zone, the restoration of a gutted building, and giving those in the community an opportunity to contribute, for example, the professional athletes.

Resources can be reusable, for example transforming a liquor store into a food market. The power and vision of the youth- the young entrepreneurs envisioned it and inspired/challenged the community to provide materials for actualizing it.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or contact at msergon@my.nl.edu

London Dad’s Counter Racist Acts with Love

A group of dads who belong to Dad Club London did a secret fundraiser to make Maurice Ellis and his family know they were welcomed into the community. This happened after Jeremy McCall, the head of the club, learned that Mr. Ellis, a newcomer in the community, had received racist acts. The group raised nearly $7,000 towards the tuition fee of Mr. Ellis wife-Carline-Leslie. Mr. McCall said it was the honor of the group to take the school’s stress off the shoulders of this couple.

Image by Megan Stacey/The London Free Press

The Black family felt welcomed and cared for in their new community. Also, the fundraiser took care of the tuition fee, hence taking off that stress.

The surprising kindness from the dads/community. The Ellis family was surprised when the dads visited and presented them with the $7,000 check.
There are enough love and care to counter hateful words and deeds.
Racial equity was increased by helping a member of a Black family complete school by providing the tuition fee.

Story shared by Margaret Sergon, USA, based on a story originally collected by the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Ball State University, Indiana, USA.

More info here or at msergon@my.nl.edu